Minneapolis restaurateur revives Native American cuisine – PBS NewsHour – DC Initiative on Racial Equity
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The pandemic took a particularly heavy toll on the restaurant business, with tens of thousands shutting their doors for good. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro visited one unusual establishment that’s bucking the trend, and reviving Native American food traditions that disappeared after European settlement in North America. It’s part of our series, “Agents for Change.”

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The pandemic took a particularly heavy toll on restaurants, with tens of thousands shutting their doors for good.

    Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro visited one unusual establishment that is bucking the trend and reviving Native American food traditions that disappeared after European settlement in North America.

    It is part of Fred’s series Agents For Change and our arts and culture series, Canvas.

  • Fred de Sam Lazaro:

    The city of Minneapolis has its roots in flour milling, its Mississippi riverfront today dotted with icons of that heritage.

    But a new centerpiece of this historic district is an enterprise with a very different take on that history.

    Sean Sherman, Founder and CEO Chef, The Sioux Chef: There was a really important Dakota village right here on this side of the river where our restaurant sits. So, for us, it’s an act of reclamation, because we’re able to bring the true namesake of this space back.

  • Fred de Sam Lazaro:

    That namesake is Sean Sherman’s restaurant called Owamni, Swirling Water in the Dakota language, and named after the much higher waterfalls that existed before industrialization brought dams.

    For


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