5 Questions To Ask To Assess A Company’s Commitment To Racial Equity – Forbes – DC Initiative on Racial Equity
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Companies that are hoping to win the war for talent must ensure that they are prioritizing racial … [+] justice in real and tangible ways

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It’s been over a year since corporate America made public pledges to prioritize racial equity following the reemergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. Despite the billions of dollars promised to the Black community, the impacts on Black employees are left to be felt. The Great Resignation has sparked an unprecedented amount of turnover, with many employees seeking environments built on equity, justice and inclusion. It is no secret that it is much more cost-efficient to retain employees versus having a revolving door of new employees entering the organization. Companies that are hoping to win the war for talent must ensure that they are prioritizing racial justice in real and tangible ways; employees are sick and tired of lip service. What questions should job candidates be asking to assess a corporation’s commitment to racial equity? What questions should company leaders be asking themselves to evaluate diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) goals as they pertain to racial equity? Below are five questions that every workplace should be thinking about when measuring racial equity efforts.

1.    What is currently being done to ensure that people of all racial backgrounds have an equal chance of being hired? A quick peruse of nearly every company’s website will reveal a statement or two indicating a commitment to “equal opportunity employment.” What is actually being done to ensure that certain demographics are not being steered away from job openings? It’s important to assess first off, where open roles are being posted. Are people of all racial backgrounds likely to see this job posting? Also reassess job requirements. Sometimes there is knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) that are listed as mandatory for a role, but in actuality they are just nice-to-haves. Are these KSAs actually necessary for the role? When was the last time a subject matter expert reviewed the job ad to ensure that the KSAs listed are actually accurate? If your organization is struggling to hire people of different racial backgrounds for a particular role, reanalyze the job description. Getting racialized communities to apply for a role is just one part of the challe


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